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Western Legal Culture – Comparative History and Theory of Legal Methods

Studium: Bachelor i juss
Studiepoeng: 15
Emnekode: JUS2007
Semester: Vår 2014
Antall studenter: 100
År i studieløpet: Tredje studieår
Emne ansvarlig: Geir Stenseth and Andreas Abegg
Grad: Bachelor

Pensum kan kjøpes hos: SINN Bok | bok.lillehammer@sopp.no

Obligatorisk pensum

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Kompendium (Obligatorisk pensum)

Kompendium kjøpes hos Storkopi Storkopi

Curriculum: Western Legal Culture – Comparative History and Theory of Legal Methods

 

Legal Methods regulate how the law evolves and how we apply the law. Legal Methods are embedded in legal culture. The course will analyze the evolution of legal methods in the two main western legal cultures, the (continental) civil law and the (English and American) common law tradition, and will examine how Norwegian law relates to these legal cultures. The course will explain how the civil law tradition created the private law - public law division, explain the division’s function in today’s society and ask whether common law follows similar concepts.

I.                  Introduction

A.    Legal Methods as gatekeeper of the law

Students can distinguish the different types of legal methods and analyze their function within legal sources like the constitution, statutes, court cases and contracts.

B.    Comparative Law, Legal History and Legal Theory as research methods

Students will understand the basic elements of the research methods of comparative law, legal history and legal theory.

  1. Jørn Øyrehagen Sunde, Champagne at the Funeral - an Introduction to Legal Culture, in: Jørn Øyrehagen Sunde/Knut Einar Skodvin, Rendezvous of European Legal Cultures, Bergen 2010, 11-28.

II.               Civil Law and Common Law

Students are able to reflect on the main differences of the civil law and common law tradition and how it affects legal reasoning in Norwegian law today.

  1. Alan Watson, The Meaning of Civil Law Systems, in: Alan Watson, The Making of the Civil Law, Cambridge/London 1981, 1-13.
  2. R.C. van Caenegem, The Englisch Common Law seen from the European Continent, in: R.C. van Caenegem, Legal History: A European Perspective, London/Rio Grande 1991, 165-183.
  3. James Gordley, Contract, Property, and the Will – The Civil Law and Common Law Tradition, in: Harry N. Scheiber, The State and Freedom of Contract, Stanford/California 1998, 66–88.

III.           Modern vs. pre-modern law

Students understand how the social context influences legal systems and its methods.

A.     Historical Roots of Western Law

  1. Michael Stolleis, The Historical Roots of European Legal Culture, in: Tidskrift utgiven av Juridiska Föreningen i Finland 2010, 501-503.
  2. R.C. van Caenegem, Law in the Medieval World, in: R.C. van Caenegem, Legal History: A European Perspective, London/Rio Grande 1991, 115-148.
  3. Alan Watson, The Evolution of Western Private Law, expanded Edition, Baltimore 2001, 261-266.
  4. Max Weber, Economy and Society, Berkeley/Los Angeles/London 1978, 635-640.
  5. Karl Polanyi, The Great Transformation, Boston 1944, Chapter I.
  6. Harold J. Berman, Law and Revolution II, The Impact of the Protestant Reformations on the Western Legal Tradition, Cambridge, Massachusetts/LondonConclusion 2003, 373-382.
  7. Thomas Vesting, Harold J. Berman (1918 ‐ 2007), in: Ancilla Iuris 2008, 57-61.
  8. Max Weber, Economy and Society, Berkeley/Los Angeles/London 1978, 865-900.
  9. Alan Watson, Civil Law, Society, and Legal Growth, in: Alan Watson, The Making of the Civil Law, Cambridge/London 1981, 179-191.
  10. R.C. van Caenegem, The 'Rechtsstaat' in Historical Perspective, in: R.C. van Caenegem, Legal History: A European Perspective, London/Rio Grande 1991, 185-199.
  11. Andreas Abegg, The Evolution of the Contracting State and its Courts, in: American Journal for Comparative Law 2011, 611-636.

B.    Societal Transformations

C.     Changes in Legal Institutions and Methods

IV.            Private Law and Public Law

Students are able to analyze the function of the private law – public law division and its effects on legal methods. They are able to reflect on the impact of public and individual interests in the law.

  1. Alan Watson, Divisions of the law, in: Alan Watson, The Making of the Civil Law, Cambridge/London 1981, 144-167.
  2. Nils Jansen/Ralf Michaels, Private Law and the State, in: RabelsZ 2007, 345–397.
  3. Bettina Banoun/Anders Ryssdal, Compelling Public Interest, in: Erik Røsaeg/Hans-Bernd Schäfer/Endre Stavang, Law and Economics, 2010, 21-37.

V.               The Case of Norway

Students will understand how the Norwegian legal culture is influenced by different western legal traditions and historical and societal contexts. In light of this, they are able to evaluate and reflect on today’s legal methods in Norwegian law.

  1. Jørn Øyrehagen Sunde, Civitas fundaretur legibus – Lawmaking in the making”, in: Themis - Revista de Faculdade de Direito da UNL 2003, 73-96.
  2. Jørn Øyrehagen Sunde, Dissenting votes in the Norwegian Supreme Court 1965-2009: A legal cultural analysis, in: Rechtskultur - Zeitschrift für Europäische Rechtsgeschichte, Heft 1, 2012, 59-73.
  3. Jørn Øyrehagen Sunde, An Unexpected Journey (A study of Norwegian Legal Literature that Indicates a Place for Norwegian Legal Culture between Civil and Common Law) – to be published in: Revista Juridica 2013.
  4. Jørn Øyrehagen Sunde, The Legal cultural dependency of the Norwegian legal method - and its future (Legal method as legal cultural link) – to be published in: Contributions to the understanding of legal argumentation in Norway and Germany 2013.
  5. Jørn Øyrehagen Sunde, The Art of being Artful, in: Jørn Øyrehagen Sunde/Knut Einar Skodvin, Rendezvous of European Legal Cultures, Bergen 2010, 29-43.
  6. Anna Nylund, Mixing Past and Future, in: Jørn Øyrehagen Sunde/Knut Einar Skodvin, Rendezvous of European Legal Cultures, Bergen 2010, 167-181.

 

 Pensum vil i størst mulig grad bli laget som et kompendium

Sist oppdatert: Anne Mørkve 03.01.2014
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